What’s inside the box?

Reading Time: 4 minutes

In the last two weeks, I was working on releasing the first OSS release of Kamus, a secret management solution for Kubernetes. To release Kamus, I had to publish a few docker images to Docker Hub and the CLI – which is deployed as an NPM package. This was the first time I had to deal with deploying packages to a repository. Doing this process thought made me thinks a lot about the (in)security of this process, and I want to share these thoughts with you. It’s all sums up to one small question – what’s inside the box? Do you know what you install when you download a package from a repository?

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Hacking Juice Shop, the DevSecOps Way

Reading Time: 6 minutes

Every DevSecOps engineer will recommend you to start using security tests. I personally just blogged about it recently – if you’re not familiar with the concept, I’ll highly encourage you to read it first. It’s sound right, but there is one important question: Can we find real exploits using security tests? Can we pwn a web application by scanning it for security issues?

The best way to find out is to take a real broken web application, scan it with various security tests and look for exploits we can use. Today victim is OWASP Juice Shop, a very famous vulnerable web application, written using NodeJS and Angular. Let’s try to hack it, the DevSecOps way!

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Investigating Kubernetes Nodes Disk Usage

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Today, I looked at our production Kubernetes cluster dashboard and I noticed something weird:

disk usage is high - almost 80%!
(sum (node_filesystem_size) – sum (node_filesystem_free)) / sum (node_filesystem_size) * 100

Well, this looks pretty bad. This is the average disk usage of the nodes running in the cluster. On average, only 20% percent of the disk in each node is available. This is probably not a good sign.

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Leveraging Web Security to Harden WordPress Security

Reading Time: 6 minutes

As you might already notice, my new blog is powered by WordPress. When I chose to start a new blog and run it WordPress, I started to look on WordPress security. There are already great posts about improving the security of your WordPress site (see for example this and this guides). There are also many posts describing various security plugins you should be installing.

All this information is critical – but it’s not enough. What about elementary web security practices? For example, leveraging security headers to protect your site? Or enabling security.txt so good hackers will know how to contact you, in case they find a vulnerability in your site?

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Want to Write Good Code? Start Using Security Tests

Reading Time: 12 minutes

I like to write code. I’m doing it a lot, both professionally and for fun. Still, writing a good code is a challenge. Writing a code that is working, maintainable and secure is very hard to achieve. This is why we need automation – to spot the issues we missed. Tools like unit tests, code coverage or security tests can help detect various issues and help us write a better code.

Let’s take an example. I’ve created a small sample app using .NET core, my favorite language. I also created one container so we have something to play with.

Now it’s time to ask – does this code has security issues? Can I publish it to production?

You can try to answer this question by reading the code, or read along and learn what tools you can start using today to spot these issues. Continue reading “Want to Write Good Code? Start Using Security Tests”